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Nevoazul nº 1 - Impermanence

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Although we live in a frenzied era where humans envy the speed of machines for a future that consumes our present, we want to raise awareness on social responsibility, sustainability and ethical consumption. We can buy faster and cheaper than ever, despising centuries of wisdom and tradition. But we believe things do not have to be that way. Change is in the small choices we make everyday. Nevoazul is a reflection of this, an invitation to balance and an ode to change, a bi-annual magazine with 120 pages where minimalism, consumerism and sustainability merge with culture, art and literature. We hope this publication will be a haven for all those who aspire to a simpler but more meaningful life.

 

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Is this the type of changes we are looking for?

Nowadays, technology is present in almost every task we perform in our daily lives. We make orange juice with an electric juicer, warm the milk in the microwave, work with computers and follow the bus route in our phones.  Envisioned by the utopias of Frank Lloyd Wright and his flying cars, we fool ourselves, believing that technology is the unquestionable solution for the future. An old fallacy that makes us buy more, preserve less and replace human relationships with machines in a flash. The critique of modern society is often portrayed in the seventh art. Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times, Jacques Tati in Mon Oncle. The latter is the one we will talk about. What had us charmed? The softness of the colors, the rigidness of the architecture, two different scenarios in one city - Paris. 

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Was Albert Einstein a minimalist?

Albert Einstein is remembered for his brilliant discoveries in the field of Physics. Without getting into the weeds, he theorized about relativity and gravity. He said they overlapped and coalesced. For instance, he postulated that light would bend in its trajectory because of the Sun’s gravitational pull. At the time, these were maddeningly complex ideas with little empirical evidence. Despite its novelty and open-endedness, he stuck his neck out — time and again. Throughout the book, Einstein is defined by his scorn for power, authority, and status quo. Moreover, he seemed to attack the fundamental societal structures and the culture of materialism. It’s clear that his love for simple living made him a better, more unique thinker. Without a doubt Einstein was an early pioneer of minimalism in the face of excess. 

Membrane

A suavidade da lã no seu estado natural e a rigidez impenetrável do gesso em estado sólido aliaram­se no projeto Membrane. Um processo de experimentação em que a lã e o gesso se misturam num molde em forma de cubo para criar um jogo de geometrias suaves e elementos rígidos. A membrana impercetível que surge entre os materiais não é mais do que a memória das suas transformações.

Snapchat - A social network of ephemerality

I ask myself if the desire for carpe diem is what made Evan Spriegel create Snapchat, an app where ephemerality rules and we are invited to share photos and videos without worrying about
tomorrow. Free from the social pressure of Facebook and Instagram, where our privacy is ever at risk, Snapchat is a breath of fresh air. What is shared on this network can only last for 10 seconds and expires after 24 hours. An ode to the right of forgetting, to honesty and to spontaneity. 

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Through the clear blue

Glass screens illuminate our days and nights. We are spectators and actors. In a second we come to the outside of the screens. We see, we learn and we consume information. But suddenly, the coin flips, the sides reverse. We transpose the glass and create, share, give what we have and expect that someone will find value in what we say. Aileen Xu lives in a state of balance between the two sides of the glass screen. A game of give and take where she never loses. She inspires and lets herself be inspired. To earn and teach. Her main platform to share her knowledge with the world is YouTube, where we’re witnesses to her honest smile and her soft voice, and believe that there is a serene place between the mountains of distraction and egotism of the online world.

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Kintsugi - The imperfect beauty of a broken plate

One of the biggest disappointments of everyday life comes when a dish slips through our fingers. Suddenly, there are shards scattered on the floor and the kitchen becomes a booby trapped minefield for bare feet. We blame our wet hands, the slippery plate plus the hurry, but that does not change the situation. The dish has lost its function, its purpose, and nothing will be as before. We regret our mistake and send our dish to a swift death. Meanwhile in Japan the ancestral art of Kintsugi is still celebrated, a restoration technique that uses gold dust to turn broken ceramics into objects even more precious than they were before. 

June 22, Kabul

In the book "Caderno Afegão", the portuguese journalist Alexandra Lucas Coelho portrays a country where beauty and fear are always on the prowl. "This story is the result of parents who opened their house to the world. A house so poor wherein eggs are fried on a gas cylinder, but so rich that Sufi philosophers and Wittgenstein are read. Most of the story will be told by the chiaroscuro coming from the blinds against the sun and while girls that laugh, dance, enjoy music, show books, the brothers’ homework, hug the father who is sick and the mother who comes home from school, put lipstick, brush their hair, and host boys before they go out."

Katte Geneta - Waves, mountains and horizons

The work of New York based artist Katte Geneta represents a complex simplicity whose elegance is as calm as it is poetic. Space and time fade away in her paintings and reveal distant places as illusions, like a lost memory wandering in our minds. With a limited palette of colors and shapes that appeal to the stillness of the soul, her art is inspired by nature and its elements. Her roots in philippines can be seen in her work through the use of volcanic materials that symbolize nature’s beauty and frailty.